The Best Yes – Lysa Terkeurst

I usually don’t review small group series that are intended to be for women’s groups, but honestly, in the last few that I’ve reviewed I’ve come to find more humor, depth, and practical application than most general small group studies. I haven’t yet determined why this is, because while the series is often obviously directed at women, it still carries a lot if relevance for us guys as well. In fact, this is a series that I plan on using in the future for my coed youth high school group.

I absolutely love the way Lysa weaves her story into the lesson, making it personal and bringing a feeling of kinship: the person in the video is sharing their lives, so it opens up those in the group to do the same later in group discussions.

Each video lesson runs about fifteen minutes and covers the following topics:

  • Set Your Heart to Wisdom
  • Establish a Pattern of Wisdom
  • Practice Wisdom
  • Predetermine Your Best Yes
  • Avoid the Traps of People Pleasing
  • Build a Best Yes Legacy

I really love the participant’s guide. It’s chock full of great resources, almost to the point that you could run the lesson without the video. Each lesson begins with a “checking in” pre-video discussion that gathers participants into the mindset and orients them on the lesson. The guide includes about two pages of notes from the lesson (which is great because it’s hard to get people to take notes) and still leaves space for individuals to scrawl their own thoughts.

The guide also does a great job of time management, helping leaders break down a suggested time frame for the lesson. Use the suggested breakdowns, but if conversation is flowing and the Spirit is moving, forget time constraints and let things move. The lessons use a fairly extensive question pool, meaning that you can easily pick and choose based on time and which ones seem right for your group.

For a between-lessons study, the book offers three different options: a thirty minute study, a fifteen minute study, and a five minute study. I love this idea because it recognizes the difficulty of getting people to do personal studies and takes away the “I didn’t have time” factor. By giving group members a variety of options, there’s time enough for anyone. Also, as a leader read through these parts and utilize some of them in the lesson. The personal study sections have some of the best material for assignments and don’t be afraid to dive into that.

Overall, I love how practical the series is. It helps you write out a plan, on paper, on purpose for success. That’s exactly what a small group series should do: equip you with the tools to better live out the Christian life.

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Author: Josh Olds

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